week

“The complete JavaScript toolkit” Skillshare course is free this week!

Chris Heilmann smiling behind his laptop as the course is finished

This July Skillshare released my course called The Complete JavaScript Toolkit and you can access it by signing up for a 2 months trial of Skillshare.

I am happy to announce that for this week, this course is now completely free. You need still to sign up for a Skillshare login, but you don’t need a Credit Card and you don’t need to sign up for the two month trial period.

So what’s keeping you? check out the course here

As a reminder, here is what you will learn in the course:

The videos are the following. We deliberately kept them short. A huge benefit of this course is to discover your own best way of working whilst watching them. It is a “try things out while you watch” kind of scenario:

  • Introduction (01:46) – introducing you to the course, explaining what we will cover and who it is for.
  • JavaScript today (08:41) – JavaScript isn’t writing a few lines of code to make websites snazzier any longer. It became a huge platform for all kinds of development.
  • Uses for JavaScript (06:25) – a more detailed view on what JavaScript does these days. And how the different uses come with different best practices and tooling.
  • Finding JavaScript Zen (04:15) – how can you stay calm in this new JavaScript world where everything is “amazing”? How can you find out what makes sense to you and what is hype?
  • Evolved Development Environments (10:22) – all you need to write JavaScript is a text editor and all to run it a browser. But that’s also limiting you more than you think.
  • Benefits of Good Editors (12:34) – by using a good editor, people who know JavaScript can become much more effective. New users of JavaScript avoid making mistakes that aren’t helpful to their learning.
  • Version Control (09:15) – using version control means you write understandable code. And it has never been easier to use Git.
  • Debugging to Linting (06:01) – debugging has been the first thing to get right to make JavaScript a success. But why find out why something went wrong when you can avoid making the mistake?
  • Keeping Current in JavaScript (05:11) – JavaScript moves fast and it can be tricky to keep up with that is happening. It can also be a real time-sink to fall for things that sound amazing but have no life-span.
  • Finding the JavaScript Community (03:59) – it is great that you know how to write JavaScript. Becoming part of a community is a lot more rewarding though.
  • Asking for Help (05:47) – gone are the days of writing posts explaining what your coding problem is. By using interactive tools you can give and get help much faster.
  • Final Thoughts (01:11) – thanks for taking the course, how may we help you further?

I wrote this to make myself more content and happy in this demanding world, and I hope it helps you, too. Old-school developers will find things to try out and new developers should get a sensible way to enter the JavaScript world.

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Developer Tools feedback channels, one week in

Last week we launched Feedback channels, with the first one out on Developer Tools in Firefox. The feedback channel on UserVoice is the place to go for any ideas or thoughts about the Firefox Developer Tools.

Looking at the first week for Developer Tools feedback

During the first week for our Developer Tools feedback channel, we got:

  • 99 new ideas
  • 1382 votes
  • 4080 unique users

Mozilla has responded to 97% of the ideas, out of which:

Notable is that many ideas that came up are things that we already have bugs for in Bugzilla and ideas and approaches that have been talked about and considered.

Thank you!

So, sincerely, thank you for all the input and constructive ideas and comments! We appreciate it a lot and by having this direct dialog and communication with you, it helps us to build better and more useful Developer Tools!

Please continue to express your ideas, vote on existing ones and stay on track with the progress!

View full post on Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

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Firefox Developer Tools work week wrap-up

Last week in Sunnyvale we had the first Developer Tools work week to include the recently-integrated Jetpack team ( for a slightly different take on the week, see Paul’s post. ). And what a week! I was a bit shocked by how many things I thought were just interesting ideas suddenly became real things that actually worked. By Friday morning we had some amazing demos from the team, which I will try to group together according to theme:

Remote everything, everywhere.



Within the next 3 months we will land remote protocol support for all of the development tools we ship. The remote protocol is a network client/server protocol that exposes the developer tools to each other external tools like editors as well as Firefox on Android and Firefox OS. We had some awesome demos that leverage or extend these capabilities:

  • Based on Heather Arthur’s work on implementing remote style editing, Paul Rouget amazed us and soon many others with remote CSS editing from popular editor Sublime Text 2: (Tweet, Youtube, Github).
  • Joe Walker showed off how to run gcli commands remotely between different instances of Firefox Desktop.
  • Jim Blandy walked us through some important platform fixes that will enable content process debugging on Firefox OS. This will allow us to support remote on-device debugging of B2G apps.

Revolutionary Dev Tools hacks

Many team members got a ton of work done on their existing projects and showed us some great enhancements by the end of the week:

  • Mihai Sucan showed off progress on the Global Console, which now understands all network requests and also supports stdin/stdout and some handy timing utilities.
  • Anton Kovalyov showed off an initial integration of Codemirror as the source editor for the devtools, replacing the current Orion editor.
  • Nick Fitzgerald got sourcemaps working with the debugger and gave us a demo of Coffeescript debugging.
  • Joe Walker re-factored gcli commands to de-couple processing from presentation, making it much easier to implement multiple commands that use a common data formatter.
  • Last but not least, Victor Porov walked us through a fully-operational Network Panel that is nearly ready to land!
  • Stephen Shorlander showed off some great first steps on defining what in-browser web app development might look like.

Developer tools + Jetpack == Super Powers!

On Tuesday Paul Rouget walked us through the fledgling developer tools API and challenged the Jetpack team to see how working with the developers could be made simpler. By Friday Irakli answered the challenge by showing us a Jetpack add-on called ‘Add-on Pad’ for live-coding SDK-based add-ons.

Dave Camp had a slightly different take on Jetpack’s possibilities and by the end of the week was able to show off a version of the Developer Tools code-base that could be dynamically re-loaded from disk using Jetpack’s CommonJS loader, without the need to re-build or even restart Firefox.

Not to be outdone, Dave Townsend made some tweaks to tilt mode to expose it to add-ons and even scratchpad hacks to change how tilt visualizes a page based on arbitrary code that could be injected either via an add-on or from scratchpad.

Paul also released a new version of his excellent Firefox Terminal add-on recently which you should go install it immediately! Right now! I’ll still be here when you get back.

Add-on developer love

The developer tools team has been focused like a laser on improving life for web developers, but Firefox itself is created and extended with web technologies like JS and CSS. At this first Devtools work week that included the Jetpack team we saw some really promising work:

  • Eddy Bruel tackled several bugs I don’t completely understand and by the end of the week showed us debugging for almost all browser chrome and add-on Javascript code. There are still some known limitations to work through ( not all add-ons or content scripts can be debugged currently ) but the Browser is already very useful to developers as of today’s Nightly build.
  • Mihai Sucan and Alexandre Poirot made changes to both the SDK and the Global Console that will pipe any calls to console.log in Jetpack code to the Global Console, greatly improving ‘printf’-style debugging for add-on developers.

Some of these hacks landed last week during the work week, many will be landing over the next couple weeks. If you’d like to get involved in driving these features home, find us in #devtools and #jetpack on irc.mozilla.org or the Developer Tools project mailing list at mozilla.dev.developer-tools.

View full post on Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

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A look into a Firefox work week

This post was originally published as A Compendium of Awesome, and is a short summary of a Firefox work week. Posted here to give an overview, with focus on some details, about things happening with Firefox developement.

Team Firefox 2012Two weeks ago, the Firefox team got together for a work week in Toronto. It was amazing. Walking through a room with that many excellent people doing excellent things was inspiringhumblingunbelievable and the hits kept on rolling.

The combined mobile and graphics teams cut the beta blocker list for Fennec Native in half. The desktop team banged together a working prototype of sign in to the browser. The firefox tech leads worked with product and project management to nail down the kilimanjaro bug list for desktop. Madhava gave a great talk about the future of Firefox UX. I would have scored it as a strong success based on those outcomes alone.

And then this happened:

Hacking

Lightning Talks

I know I’ve missed things. I know some of it is still being written up. In fact, I’m not even the first to write a round up post. Here’s Finkle doing the same, and dcamp, and cwiiis.

FX-Team is big enough these days that it’s quite an undertaking to get us all together in one place. But man, it’s phenomenal when we do.

View full post on Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

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