\\Share

Don’t pay me to speak – share instead

No money

I just made an announcement on Twitter on something I’ve been doing for a while. Something I’d love more people with the same privilege as I enjoy doing:

It is a wonderful situation to be in a full-time employment and get the chance to present at events. It also is a tricky one. Your work contract often doesn’t allow any extra income. And even if that is the case, you need to deal with taxes and paperwork coming from that. You also don’t want to be the person taking a speaking slot away from someone who does it for a living and is great at it. Or someone who starts out and needs the pay to be able to afford it in the first place. You also don’t want to be a speaker because you are a freebie for the conference organisers.

Conference organisers are under a lot of pressure these days. They are rightfully asked to offer a diverse line-up and be open to lots of people to attend. Elitism and gatherings of the privileged are things to avoid. Sometimes it is hard for a small to medium conference to budget for that. It is not enough to offer free tickets. Often people who could benefit from an event and bring a different point of view can’t even afford getting there.

To help making this easier, I’ve been forfeiting my speaker fees for quite a while. Instead I ask conference organisers to put the money into efforts that bring people who can’t afford it to the event. It means no paperwork for me, no worries about annoying my employer and yet it means I am not a freebie presenter.

I hope that this helps a bit making what we have here even better than it is now. Thanks to all the conference organisers who put effort into this.

Photo by Neubie

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Quickie: A scriptless, imageless, no-third party code Twitter share button for WordPress

Pestered by my colleague Jason Weathersby (“you should have a share button on your blog, I don’t want to copy and paste the title and the URL”) I just added a “share on Twitter” button at the end of all my posts here on the blog. I looked at a few plugins and the official buttons and was not impressed as they all meant a lot of external JS and CSS and HTTP requests. That is not needed. So here is a Twitter Share button without any extra resources from the outside.

JS Bin

It is simple enough:

  • The structure of a “share on Twitter” URL is http://twitter.com/share?url={url to share}&text={text to share}&via={twitter name}
  • In WordPress you get the title of the current post in PHP with the_title() and the permalink of the post with the_permalink()
  • Put them together and you are done:
<p class="tweetthis">
  <a href="http://twitter.com/share
           ?url=<?php the_permalink();?>
           &text=<?php the_title();?>
           &via={your twitter name}" target="_blank">
    share on twitter
  </a>
</p>

Add some styling and we’re in the business. Want to add more sharing buttons without JS? Toby Osbourne has a good post on more URL structures of social sites.

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Learn and share about new topics every month on MDN

Did you have “expand my technical knowledge” as one of your New Year’s resolutions a few months ago? How’s that going?

How about setting aside a day, or just a few hours, once a month, to teach yourself about a topic related to Web development, and share what you’ve learned with others? Wouldn’t it be fun to do that alongside a bunch other people, either virtually, or maybe in person?

Monthly MDN sprints

Based on discussions among the core MDN community, we’re upping the frequency of MDN doc sprints from “roughly once a quarter” to once per month. To keep them from getting too routine, we’re going to focus on a couple of different topics each month. One will be the topic of the following month’s DevDerby contest; the other will be something related to Firefox OS or open web apps. But since Firefox OS and open web apps are built with open Web technologies, that’s a pretty wide range to pick from. And of course, no one’s going to stop you from working on a different relevant topic of your choice.

As background, a doc sprint is a short period when a group of people come together (virtually or actually, or some combination) to collaborate on writing documentation. If “writing documentation” sounds boring, think of it as a “learning and sharing” sprint. And if you’re not a “words” person, writing example code is a great way to contribute. You’ve probably experienced how much someone can learn from a good code example.

We’ve set dates and some topics for the next three sprints (see below). The first one is just a week away, to squeeze it into March, before Easter weekend.

  • March 22-23: getUserMedia, offline storage
  • April 26-28: Web Workers, Web device APIs (specific ones TBD)
  • May 31-June 1: Topics TBD

These dates are all in the MDN Community Calendar.

How to join a sprint

Sprints run for two or three days, but you can join for whatever part of that you are able to.

  1. Take a look at the wiki page for the sprint you’re joining, for specific details.
  2. During the sprint, hop into the #devmo channel on irc.mozilla.org, and introduce yourself. There will be other sprinters in the channel, unless they’re all asleep.
  3. Login to MDN and get started.

That’s it for participating virtually. In some cases, there will be in-person meet-ups. For example, for the April sprint, there will be a meet-up in the Mozilla Space in Vancouver, British Columbia. (Watch for further details!) Or you can organize a local sprint meet-up of your own, like Fred Bourgeon did in Montréal in February. This could be as simple as tweeting an invitation to meet up at a local coffee shop. Check out our (draft) Doc sprint planning guide if you’re interested.

Meet-up or not, please join us for one or more of the upcoming sprints. It’s a great opportunity to give something back to the Web development community, while expanding your own understanding at the same time.

View full post on Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Sr Share Point Developer

Adecco USA Melville, NY
Job description: …individual who will be tasked to develop customized SharePoint applications using C# and ASP.Net. The candidate must be very…developing solutions in MOSS 2007Experience in developing web parts, features, solutions, site definitions, page layouts and custom… View full post on Dice.com – Web Application

View full post on WebProJobs.org

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Web browser market share: upgrade analysis

April was the first time that Internet Explorer 9 and Firefox 4 were available for the full month, making it the first chance to really get a feel for how rapidly users are switching to the new offerings—and the first opportunity to see if compelling new versions are able to halt Internet Explorer’s market share slide, or spur new interest in Firefox. Both Microsoft and Mozilla will be …

View full post on web development – Yahoo! News Search Results

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Share Point Architect

Digipulse Technologies, Inc Lincoln, NE
Job description: …documentation. managed metadata service, search, usage and health data collection, web analytics, and user profile. Preferred qualifications:Microsoft Certification Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS): Microsoft Office SharePoint 2010: Configuration and… View full post on Dice.com – Search Specialist

View full post on WebProJobs.org

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)