Decoded

First Decoded Chat of the year: Paul Bakaus on AMP

Today on the Decoded Blog I published the first ever Decoded Chat I recorded, where I grilled Paul Baukaus in detail about AMP.

This is an hour long Skype call and different to the newer ones – I was still finding the format :). There are quite a few changes that happened to AMP since then and soon there will be an AMP Summit to look forward to. All in all, I do hope though that this will give you some insight into what AMP is and what it could be if the focus were to go away from “Google only” with it.

These are the questions we covered:

  1. What is AMP to you?
  2. The main focus of AMP seems to be mobile, is that fair to say?
  3. Was AMP an answer to Facebooks’ and Apple’s news formats? Does it rely on Google technology and – if so – will it be open to other providers?
  4. It seems that the cache infrastructure of AMP is big and expensive. How can we ensure it will not just go away as an open system as many other open APIs vanished?
  5. Do large corporations have a problem finding contributors to open source projects? Are they too intimidating?
  6. Is there a historical issue of large corporations re-inventing open source solutions to “production quality code”? Is this changing?
  7. Whilst it is easy to get an AMP version of your site with plugins to CMS, some of the content relies on JavaScript. Will this change?
  8. AMP isn’t forgiving. One mistake in the markup and the page won’t show up. Isn’t that XHTML reinvented – which we agreed was a mistake.
  9. AMP seems to be RSS based on best practices in mobile performance. How do we prevent publishers to exclusively create AMP content instead of fixing their broken and slow main sites?
  10. It seems to me that AMP is a solution focused on CMS providers. Is that fair, and how do we reach those to allow people to create AMP without needing to code?
  11. A lot of “best practice” content shown at specialist events seems to be created for those. How can we tell others about this?
  12. AMP seems to be designed to be limiting. For example, images need a height and width, right?
  13. In terms of responsive design, does the AMP cache create differently sized versions of my images?
  14. Are most of the benefits of AMP limited to Chrome on Android or does it have benefits for other browsers, too?
  15. Do the polyfills needed for other browsers slow down AMP?
  16. How backwards compatible is AMP?
  17. One big worry about publishing in AMP is that people are afraid of being fully dependent on Google. Is that so?
  18. Are there any limitations to meta information in AMP pages? Can I add – for example – Twitter specific meta information?
  19. Do AMP compatible devices automatically load that version and – if not – can I force that?
  20. How can I invalidate the AMP cache? How can I quickly remove content that is wrong or dangerous?
  21. Right now you can’t use third party JavaScript in an AMP page. Are you considering white-listing commonly used libraries?
  22. It seems AMP is catered to documents, while most people talk about making everything an App. Is this separation really needed?
  23. What’s the sandbox of AMP and how is this now extended to the larger web as a standard proposal?

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Decoded chats the fifth: Ada Rose Edwards on Progressive Web Apps

A few weeks after I pestered Ada Rose Edwards to write her first Smashing Magazine article on Progressive Web Apps I did a Skype call with her to talk about the same topic.

You can see the video and get the audio recording of our chat over at the Decoded blog:

ada video interviww

Ada is a great talent in our market and I am looking forward to pestering her to do more of these good things.

Here are the questions we covered:

  1. Ada, you just wrote on Smashing Magazine about “The building blocks of progressive web apps”. Can you give a quick repeat on what they are?
  2. We’ve had a few attempts at using web technology to build app like experiences. A lot of them left end users disappointed. What do you think were the main mistakes developers did?
  3. Is the “app shell” model a viable one or is this against the idea of “content first” web sites turning into apps?
  4. You worked on one of the poster-child web-technology based apps in the past – the Financial Times app. What were the main challenges you faced there?
  5. It seems that in the mobile space it is OK to abandon platforms that arent’ used much any longer, should that be something to consider for the web and browsers, too?
  6. Progressive Web apps do away with the concept of a need of an app store. This is more convenient, but it also poses a UX challenge. Users aren’t expecting a web site to work offline. What can we do to break that assumption?
  7. The wonderful thing about PWAs is that they are progressive, which means that platforms that don’t support ServiceWorkers should still have a good experience and fall back to a classic “add to homescreen” scenario. What can we do to avoid people forgetting about this and build “this app needs Chrome on latest Android” apps instead?
  8. Are responsive interfaces a unique skill of web developers? Is it something we learned simply because of the nature of the platform?
  9. The distribution model of PWAs is the hyperlink. You pointed out rightfully in your article that there needs to be a way to share this link and send it to others. Hardliners of the web also argue that a URL should be visible and “hackable”. Do you think this is a valid need?
  10. What about Instant Apps on Android? Aren’t they a threat to Progressive Web Apps?
  11. What can we do to avoid PWAs becoming the new “m.example.com”? The average web site it too big and slow to become and app. How high are your hopes that this new approach could help the web as a whole become slimmer?

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Decoded Chats – fourth edition featuring Sarah Drasner on SVG

At SmashingConf Freiburg I took some time to interview Sarah Drasner on SVG.

In this interview we covered what SVG can bring, how to use it sensibly and what pitfalls to avoid.

You can see the video and get the audio recording of our chat over at the Decoded blog:

helicopter interrupting the interview with Sarah

Sarah is a dear friend and a lovely person and knows a lot about animation and SVG.

Here are the questions we covered:

  1. SVG used to be a major “this is the future of the web” and then it vanished for a while. What is the reason of the new interest in a format that old?
  2. Tooling in SVG seems to be still lagging behind in what Flash gave us. Are there any good tools that have – for example – a full animation timeline?
  3. SVG syntax on first glance seems rather complex due to its XML format and lots of shortcut notations. Or is it just a matter of getting used to it?
  4. Coordinate systems seem to be easy to understand, however when it comes to dynamic coordinate systems and vector basics people get lost much easier. When you teach, is this an issue?
  5. What about prejudices towards SVG? It is rumoured to be slow and very memory intense. Is this true?
  6. Presets of tools seem to result in really large SVG files which is why we need extra tools to optimise them. Is this improving with the new-found interest in SVG?
  7. There seems to be a “war of animation tools”. You can use SVG, CSS Animations, The Web Animation API, or JavaScript libraries. What can developer do about this? Should we learn all of them?
  8. There are security issues with linking to external SVG files which makes them harder to use than – for example – images. This can be discouraging and scary for implementers, what can we do there?
  9. Does SVG live in the uncanny valley between development and design?
  10. Is there one thing you’d love people to stop saying about SVG as it is not true but keeps coming up in conversations?

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Future Decoded 2016 – My talk on Machine Learning, Terminators and Star Trek

Yesterday I went to the Excel in London for Future Decoded to learn a lot about the future of technology, finally see the DeLorian from Back to the Future and give a talk. I covered Machine Learning, its ethics, its effects on the job market and what we as developers need to do to make Artificial Intelligence work for rather than against humans.

DeLorian from Back to the Future

Apparently it was more relaxing that the Great British Bake Off:

Sadly, there was no video recording, but I recorded my own screencast again. The video is on YouTube

The slides are available on SlideShare.

I will repeat this talk slightly amended and more about the ethics and ideas as the Friday Keynote of the upcoming Øredev Conference in Malmø so see you there?

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Decoded Chats – third edition featuring Chris Wilson on JavaScript and Web Standards

At the Microsoft/Mozilla Progressive Web Apps workshop in Seattle I ran into Chris Wilson and took the opportunity to interview him on Web Standards, JavaScript dependency and development complexity.

In this first interview we covered the need for JavaScript in today’s web and how old-school web standards stand up to today’s needs.

You can see the video and get the audio recording of our chat over at the Decoded blog:

Monica saying hi

Chris has been around the web block several times and knows a lot about standards and how developers make them applicable to various different environments. He worked on various browsers and has a high passion for the open web and empowering developers with standards and great browsers.

Here are the questions we covered:

  • A current hot topic that seems to come up every few years is the dependency of web products on JavaScript, and if we could do without it. What is the current state there?
  • Didn’t the confusion start when we invented the DOM and allowed for declarative and programmatic access to the document? JavaScript can create HTML and CSS and give us much more control over the outcome.
  • One of the worries with Web Components was that it would allow developers to hide a lot of complexity in custom elements. Do we have a problem understanding that modules are meant to be simple?
  • Isn’t part of the issue that the web was built on the premise of documents and that a nature of modules needs to be forced into it? CSS has cascade in its name, yet modules shouldn’t inherit styles from the document.
  • Some functionality needed for modern interfaces seem to be achievable with competing standards. You can animate in CSS, JavaScript and in SVG. Do different standard working groups not talk to each other?
  • Declarative functionality in CSS and HTML can be optimised by browser makers. When you – for example – create animations in JavaScript, we can’t do that for you. Is that a danger?
  • A lot of JavaScript enhancements we see in browsers now is enhancing existing APIs instead of inventing new ones. Passive Event listeners is a great example. Is this something that will be the way forward?
  • One thing that seems to be wasteful is that a lot of research that went into helper libraries in the past dies with them. YUI had a lot of great information about animation and interaction. Can we prevent this somehow?
  • Do you feel that hacks die faster these days? Is a faster release schedule of browsers the solution to not keeping short-term solutions clog up the web?
  • It amazes me what browsers allow me to do these days and create working layouts and readable fonts for me. Do you think developers don’t appreciate the complexity of standards and CSS enough?

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Decoded Chats – second edition featuring Monica Dinculescu on Web Components

At SmashingConf Freiburg this year I was lucky enough to find some time to sit down with Monica Dinculescu (@notwaldorf) and chat with her about Web Components, extending the web, JavaScript dependency and how to be a lazy but dedicated developer. I’m sorry about the sound of the recording and some of the harsher cuts but we’ve been interrupted by tourists trying to see the great building we were in who couldn’t read signs that it is closed for the day.

You can see the video and get the audio recording of our chat over at the Decoded blog:

Monica saying hi

I played a bit of devil’s advocate interviewing Monica as she has a lot of great opinions and the information to back up her point of view. It was very enjoyable seeing the current state of the web through the eyes of someone talented who just joined the party. It is far too easy for those who have been around for a long time to get stuck in a rut of trying not to break up with the past or considering everything broken as we’ve seen too much damage over the years. Not so Monica. She is very much of the opinion that we can trust developers to do the right thing and that by giving them tools to analyse their work the web of tomorrow will be great.

I’m happy that there are people like her in our market. It is good to pass the torch to those with a lot of dedication rather than those who are happy to use whatever works.

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Decoded Chats – first edition live on the Decoded Blog

Over the last few weeks I was busy recording interviews with different exciting people of the web. Now I am happy to announce that the first edition of Decoded Chats is live on the new Decoded Blog.

Decoded Chats - Chris interviewing Rob Conery

In this first edition, I’m interviewing Rob Conery about his “Imposter Handbook“. We cover the issues of teaching development, how to deal with a constantly changing work environment and how to tackle diversity and integration.

We’ve got eight more interviews ready and more lined up. Amongst the people I talked to are Sarah Drasner, Monica Dinculescu, Ada-Rose Edwards, Una Kravets and Chris Wilson. The format of Decoded Chats is pretty open: interviews ranging from 15 minutes to 50 minutes about current topics on the web, trends and ideas with the people who came up with them.

Some are recorded in a studio (when I am in Seattle), others are Skype calls and yet others are off-the-cuff recordings at conferences.

Do you know anyone you’d like me to interview? Drop me a line on Twitter @codepo8 and I see what I can do 🙂

View full post on Christian Heilmann

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)