2014

Firefox OS auf der MobileTechCon Berlin 2014

Vor zwei Tagen war ich in Berlin auf der MobileTechCon und hielt neben der Eröffnungskeynote am zweiten Tag auch einen Vortrag über den aktuellen Stand von Firefox OS.

Geschätlich in Berlin

Da das Publikum den Vortrag gerne auf Deutsch haben wollte, hatte ich kurzfristig umgeschwenkt und ihn dann auf sowas wie Deutsch gehalten.

Hier sind die Slides und die Screencasts. Der erste ist nur vom Vortrag, der zweite beinhaltet auch die Fragen und Antworten mit ein paar Beispielen wie man zum Beispiel die Developer Tools im Firefox verwenden kann, was together.js ist und wozu das gut ist und ein paar weitere “Schmankerln des offenen Netzes”.

Das alles is sehr ungeschnitten und war mehr oder minder im Moment geändert, daher kann es sein das da auch ungezogene Worte mit dabei sind. Die Slides sind auf Slideshare erhältlich.

Den halbstündigen Vortrag gibt es hier als Screencast zu sehen:

Wer den ganzen Vortrag mit Fragen und Antworten hören will, gibt es hier die ganze Stunde als Screencast.

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Maker Party 2014 – go and show off the web to the next makers

Today is the start of this year’s Maker Party campaign. What’s that? Check out this video.

webmaker

Maker Party is Mozilla’s annual campaign to teach the culture, mechanics and citizenship of the web through thousands of community-run events around the world from July 15-September 15, 2014.

This week, Maker Party events in places like Uganda, Taiwan, San Francisco and Mauritius mark the start of tens of thousands of educators, organizations and enthusiastic web users just like you getting together to teach and learn the web.

You can join Maker Party by finding an event in your area and learning more about how the web works in a fun, hands-on way with others. Events are open to everyone regardless of skill level, and almost all are free! Oh, and there will be kickoff events in all the Mozspaces this Thursday—join in!

No events in your area? Why not host one of your own? Maker Party Resources provides all the information you need to successfully throw an event of any size, from 50+ participants in a library or hackerspace to just you and your little sister sitting on the living room sofa.

Go teach the web, believe me, it is fun!

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[video+slides] FirefoxOS – HTML5 for a truly world-wide-web (Sapo Codebits 2014)

Chris Heilmann at SAPO codebits
Today the good people at Sapo released the video of my Codebits 2014 keynote.

In this keynote, I talk about FirefoxOS and what it means in terms of bringing mobile web connectivity to the world. I explain how mobile technology is unfairly distributed and how closed environments prevent budding creators from releasing their first app. The slides are “>available on Slideshare as the video doesn’t show them.

There’s also a screencast on YouTube.

Since this event, Google announced their Android One project, and I am very much looking forward how this world-wide initiative will play out and get more people connected.

Photo by José P. Airosa ‏@joseairosa

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Too easy – didn’t learn – my keynote at jQuery Europe 2014

christian heilmann at jQuery Europe 2014

I am right now on the plane back to England after my quick stint at Vienna giving the keynote at jQuery Europe 2014. True to my ongoing task to challenge myself as a speaker (and as announced here before) I made a bit of a bet by giving a talk that is not in itself technical, but analytical of what we do as developers. The talk was filmed and if you can’t wait, I made the slides available and recorded a screencast (with low sound, sorry).

There is also a audio recording on SoundCloud and on archive.org.

Quick keynote recap

In the keynote, I tried to analyse the massive discrepancy between what we as web developers get and how happy we seem to be.

We are an elite group in the job market: we are paid well, our work environment is high-tech and our perks make other people jealous. We even get the proverbial free lunches.

And yet our image is that of unsatisfied, hard to work with people who need to be kept happy and are socially awkward. I was confused that a group with all the necessary creature comforts is not an example of how easy working together could be. Instead, we even seem to need codes of conduct for our events to remind people not to behave badly towards people of the other sex or cultural background. Are we spoiled? Are we just broken? Or is there more?

I’ve found a few reasons why we can come across as unsatisfied and hard to handle and the biggest to me was that whilst we are getting pampered, we lack real recognition for what we do.

When you get a lot, but you yourself feel you are not really doing much, you are stuck between feeling superior to others who struggle with things you consider easy and feeling like a fraud. Instead of trying to communicate out about what we do, how much work it involves and why we do things in a certain way we seem to flee into a world of blaming our tools and trying to impress one another.

Initial Feedback

I am very happy to report that the feedback I got at the event was very good. I had some criticism, which is great as it gives me something to think about. And I had some heartfelt remarks from people who said I’ve opened their eyes a bit as to why they behaved in a certain way and now know how to fix some issues and clashes they had.

Want more?

I don’t want to repeat it all here again – if wanted, I could write a larger article on the subject to be published somewhere with more eyeballs. Simply listen to the recording or wait for the video to be released.

Material

I couldn’t have done this without watching some other talks and reading some other posts, so here are links to the materials used:

Thanks

I want to thank the audience of jQuery Europe for listening and being open to something different. I also want to thank the organisers for taking the chance (and setting the speakers up in the most epic hotel I ever stayed in). I also want to point out that another talk at jQuery Europe 2014 – “A Web Beyond Touch” by Petro Salema was one of the most amazing first stage performances by a speaker I have seen. So keep your eyes open for this video.

Photo by Douglas Neiner

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – Change is the New Norm with Brad Frost

In this 8 minute interview with Brad Frost, mobile web strategist and front-end designer located in Pittsburgh, PA we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including how change is the new norm and:

* How we must prepare for and embrace constant change
* How our current device landscape has a plethora of desktops, laptops, netbooks, tablets, feature phones, smartphones, and more
* His vision for a future-friendly web
* How the rapid pace of technological change is accelerating, and our current processes, standards, and infrastructure are quickly reaching their breaking points
* While this era of ubiquitous connectivity creates new challenges, it also creates tremendous opportunities to reach people wherever they may be
* The need for laser focus
* The need for agnostic content
* The future is ours to make… friendly

More About a Future-Friendly Web

According to Brad, It is time to move towards a friendlier future. We live in a world that’s exploding with technological innovation and the rapid pace of change is only accelerating. We’re at the forefront of a new revolution in which we are unprepared for. Before we can take advantage of all the exciting possibilities technology has to offer, we must first change the way we think.

Enter the Future Friendly Manifesto. In order to become more future-friendly, we must:

Acknowledge and embrace unpredictability.
Think and behave in a future-friendly way.
Help others do the same.

I want to expound on what I think it means to be future-friendly and why you need to care.

Provide Real Worth

People’s capacity for bullshit is rapidly diminishing. As technology becomes more ubiquitous, people are getting used to the idea of interacting solely with things they want to interact with whenever they damn well please.

For companies and creators who have long enjoyed force-feeding their own flavor of bullshit to the masses, this is a very scary thing. However, this doesn’t need to be the case. The opportunity exists for creators to reach people, however it can’t be in the insincere methods of the past. Instead, we must deliver real worth.
Content Like Water

In order to provide real worth, we must deliver strong, purposeful content to people wherever they may be. Currently, this includes a plethora of mobile devices, tablets, e-readers and more, but this is just the beginning.

Instead of chasing down the latest and greatest device of the month, focus your efforts on creating worthwhile content that is properly structured to go anywhere. Because it will be going everywhere.

“We need to build smarter content, not smarter containers.” — Stephanie Rieger

Beyond the Desktop

One small step for man. One giant step in the right direction. I’m in the web world and I think it’s amazing that 50% of web designers still don’t consider mobile. I hate to break it to you, but people aren’t lining up around the block to get the latest Dell tower. It’s time to acknowledge the diversity of connected devices and prepare for even more diversity. We don’t know what the future holds, but we need to be ready. Take that first step in the right direction and begin designing for diversity.
Pragmatic Idealism

No one has the answers. In fact, we all have a hell of a lot more questions. We know that we can’t predict the future and that things can’t change overnight. But we can move in a more future-friendly direction. And that’s going to take all of us. It’s going to require rethinking how we work, the tools we use and most importantly the things that we make. Let’s advocate for better tools: CMSes, browsers, design tools and better interplay between devices.
Into the Great Wide Open

Let’s embrace the unpredictability of the future. Let’s create meaningful content for people and encourage others to do the same. The future is ours to make —friendly.

Disruption will only accelerate. The quantity and diversity of connected devices—many of which we haven’t imagined yet—will explode, as will the quantity and diversity of the people around the world who use them.
Our existing standards, workflows, and infrastructure won’t hold up. Today’s onslaught of devices is already pushing them to the breaking point. They can’t withstand what’s ahead.
Proprietary solutions will dominate at first. Innovation necessarily precedes standardization. Technologists will scramble to these solutions before realizing (yet again) that a standardized platform is needed to maintain sanity.
The standards process will be painfully slow. We will struggle with (and eventually agree upon) appropriate standards. During this period, the web will fall even further behind proprietary solutions.

A New Hope

But there’s hope. While we can’t know exactly what the future will bring, we can:

Acknowledge and embrace unpredictability.
Think and behave in a future-friendly way.
Help others do the same.

The future is ours to make —friendly.
Undersignums
Signatures of the names that follow

Luke Wroblewski
Scott Jenson
Brad Frost
Jeremy Keith
Lyza D. Gardner
Scott Jehl
Stephanie Rieger
Jason Grigsby
Bryan Rieger
Josh Clark
Tim Kadlec
Brian LeRoux
Andrea Trasatti

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – ECommerce with Dan Palmquist

In this 8 minute interview with Dan Palmquist, Executive Director at TransFirst, we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including eCommerce trends and integrated payment processing and:

* What is integrated payment processing all about?
* Is integrated payment processing compliant?
* Why is integrated payment processing important for web professionals?
* Ease of use, more features with less cost
* Who is the target market for integrated payment processing?

More about Integrated Payment Processing: A Growing Trend for 2014

By Dan Palmquist, Executive Director, eCommerce Service Division, TransFirst®

In today’s information technology environment, many managed service providers (MSPs) and value-added resellers (VARs) serve as trusted advisors to their clients, offering a very high-level of support across marketing, integration and sales. These are critical elements in an evolving marketplace — one in which IT and software professionals have a keen sense of how recurring revenue in payment models can build over time and contribute significant revenue to one’s core business practices.
Payment processing providers can work together with MSPs and VARs to develop tactics for the reseller to bring payment services in-house, to help garner more revenue than traditional referral models have allowed. The payment processing provider would educate and give a reseller the tools to effectively price and board a merchant without intervention from the payment processor; it is this intervention that historically has kept the reseller community in minority revenue share positions.

MSPs and VARs should be encouraged to do the small amount of work involved to board an application through a payment processor’s automated boarding tools — with some initial training, almost all merchants can be accommodated with minimal price and fee negotiations. It involves a minor investment on the part of the service provider, along with assistance from the payment processor, to earn significant revenue share. It should be relatively easy for most VARs to make this transition. The best payment processing providers also offer training and marketing support, along with the desire to sell-through this service, as most MSPs have done across various product lines.

Integrated payment processing is seeing active endorsement among VARs in a diverse group of industries — including business-to-business, business-to-consumer, business-to-government and medical — served by web and SAS providers of all sizes. A payment processing provider should offer a robust payments gateway option to ease integration work from the old standard dial builds, along with easy-to-use APIs. This strategy can create a successful enterprise for all parties. The strategy can be applied to any vertical where payments are an important inclusion for true managed services.

For more information about integrated payment processing, please contact Brett Healey at TransFirst: 317.492.9999 or bhealey@transfirst.com.

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – Native Advertising with Rebecca Lieb

In this 8 minute interview with Rebecca Lieb, analyst at Altimeter Group where she covers digital advertising and media, an area that encompasses brands, publishers, agencies, and technology vendors we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including Native Advertising Trends and:

* How Native Advertising, is a form of converged media (Content and Paid advertising)
* What this means for new types of marketing and new ways to reach audiences
* How the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is weigh in in to set best practices
* How the FTC sets the stage Web publishers
* How the NY Times launches a manifesto regarding what Native means to that publication
* How this affects promoted post and advertorial
* How drops in efficacy in banner ads is affecting marketers (consumers aren’t clicking)
* How Web publishers are looking for new sources of revenue
* What this means for branding on the web

More on Native Advertising

More on the FTC Rules

The McClatchy Washington D.C. office is reporting that readers may assume that. But changes in the media and the way people get their news drove the federal agency Wednesday to weigh the issue of disclosure about Internet stories that look like real news stories. The workshop’s title said it all: “Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content”?

Responsible for policing deceptive business practices, the agency’s leaders are concerned that technology, innovation and the rapid spread of social media as platforms for information sharing are turning traditional advertising on its head.

What concerns the agency is “native advertising,” designed to look and feel to a reader like a news article or the content of a website.

“Native advertising is taking a lot of different shapes and forms online,” Mary K. Engle, the FTC’s associate director of the advertising practices division, told McClatchy.

When newspapers commanded the advertising dollars, the FTC policed for deceptive ads. In fact, three of the first five cases after the FTC’s creation in 1914 involved newspaper advertising. In recent decades, “advertorials” that looked like newspaper articles were the rage, and the FTC monitored them to ensure that readers knew the difference.

In the digital age, newer players such as Mashable and The Huffington Post command huge numbers of page views and are pushing the envelope for online ads.

The FTC is trying to determine whether specific rules or guidance are needed for online advertising. Wednesday’s daylong public meeting was designed to hear from all sides of the issue: online publishers, middlemen and advertisers.

“It’s a learning experience for us, and the question is do consumers understand what is happening?” asked Engle, whose agency gave guidance for providers of paid search-engine results in 2002 and again this year, when lines began blurring again.

The result of the hearing might be a more exhaustive study of the industry.

“I think we haven’t decided that yet,” Engle said.

One key issue is transparency, to ensure that consumers can distinguish whether an article on a social media site is original content or some form of paid advertisement.

“There is clearly benefit to having some consistent principles on how we do this,” said Todd R. Haskell, the senior vice president for digital media at Hearst Magazines, part of the Hearst Corp. and the publisher of 20 U.S. magazines that range from Cosmopolitan to Country Living.

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – HTML5 with Edward J. Correia

In this 7 minute interview with Edward J. Correia, Managing Editor @TheChannelCompany we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including the growing number of benefits of HTML5:

* HTML5 development is in full swing and will continue to blossom
* HTML5 will become more powerful as it develops
* HTML5 better and easier way to develop applications for both small business and the enterprise
* Why is HTML5 better than Java for cross-platform development?
* Java continues to solve many cross-platform issues. But it also introduces obstacles
* How JavaScript, the language formerly known as Mocha, later LiveScript, proved more useful than Java in some ways because it could interact with the browser and control content display using HTML’s cascading style sheets (CSS).
* How JavaScript support soon became standard in every browser. It is now the programming language of HTML5, which is currently
being considered by the World Wide Web Consortium as the next markup-language standard
* HTML5 offers a more attractive alternative. Just write your application and run it on any kind of computing device, whether it’s a phone, tablet, netbook, desktop, or TV. If the device supports HTML5, it will run there
* What other JavaScript-related language efforts are on the horizon
* Intel is directly involved in the advancement of HTML5 and JavaScript
* Software is yhe differentater regardless of the platform
* HTML5 opens the doors for enhanced websites as well

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – Web Design with Maryam Taheri

In this 10 minute interview with Maryam Taheri Growth Marketing Manager @CreativeMarket we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including Web design and Social Media Trends:

* What old is new again (flat design, simplicity and minimalism)
* Home page sliders are disappearing
* Single page scrolling
* User centered design
* Less can be more
* Long extensive contact forms are fading for simplistic design
* Making complex things simple
* Logo and banners ads are changing
* Typography is in with information looking beautiful
* Using less fonts ( 2-3) are the trend
* Less Flash
* Parallax design us still controversial among designers
* Social media jobs are the trend
* Social scheduling is a trend

More about Parallax

According to Wikipedia, Parallax is a displacement or difference in the apparent position of an object viewed along two different lines of sight, and is measured by the angle or semi-angle of inclination between those two lines.[1][2] The term is derived from the Greek ?????????? (parallaxis), meaning “alteration”. Nearby objects have a larger parallax than more distant objects when observed from different positions, so parallax can be used to determine distances.

Astronomers use the principle of parallax to measure distances to celestial objects including to the Moon, the Sun, and to stars beyond the Solar System. For example, the Hipparcos satellite took measurements for over 100,000 nearby stars. This provides a basis for other distance measurements in astronomy, the cosmic distance ladder. Here, the term “parallax” is the angle or semi-angle of inclination between two sight-lines to the star.

Parallax also affects optical instruments such as rifle scopes, binoculars, microscopes, and twin-lens reflex cameras that view objects from slightly different angles. Many animals, including humans, have two eyes with overlapping visual fields that use parallax to gain depth perception; this process is known as stereopsis. In computer vision the effect is used for computer stereo vision, and there is a device called a parallax rangefinder that uses it to find range, and in some variations also altitude to a target.

A simple everyday example of parallax can be seen in the dashboard of motor vehicles that use a needle-style speedometer gauge. When viewed from directly in front, the speed may show exactly 60; but when viewed from the passenger seat the needle may appear to show a slightly different speed, due to the angle of viewing.

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Web Professional Trends for 2014 – User Experience with Tomer Sharon

In this 10 minute interview with Tomer Sharon, User Experience (UX) Researcher @Google we talk about Web Professional Trends for 2014 including User Experience and Startups:

* Startups are increasingly interested in their own UX research
* Advice for UX research
* User Experience techniques
* UX research methods
* Links to UX resources
* Common UX pitfalls and how to avoid them
* UX case study

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