Artificial Intelligence in Web Development

What is Artificial Intelligence (AI)?

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the ability of a computer program or a machine to think and learn. It is also a field of study which tries to make computers smart. As machines become increasingly capable, mental facilities once thought to require intelligence are removed from the definition. Artificial intelligence (AI) is an area of computer science that emphasizes the creation of intelligent machines that work and react like humans. Some of the activities computers with artificial intelligence are designed for include: Speech recognition and learning.

Why is AI important?

Artificial Intelligence is the machines which are designed and programmed in such a manner that they and think and act like a human. Artificial Intelligence becomes the important part of our daily life. Our life is changed by AI because this technology is used in a wide area of day to day services.

Graphic showinf human and robot arm about to touch

Why Implement AI in Website Development?

More and more users prefer searching for goods directly through the Amazon instead of searching. Large e-commerce companies are changing our attitude to online purchasing and, as a result, to website development. Successful e-commerce companies actively implement innovative technologies in their work such as: chatbots, voice search, and other AI solutions. Here are some benefits of Artificial Intelligence implementation for website development.

  • Make search even faster
  • Make interactions with visitors even better
  • Provide a more relevant customer experience
  • Provide a personalized store experience
  • Even more effective marketing to targeted consumers

You can find many more details in this article.

Artificial Intelligence can be used in Web Development and Marketing

The user interface design process involves a lot a creativity and often starts on a whiteboard where designers share ideas. Once a design is drawn, it is usually captured within a photograph and manually translated into some working HTML wireframe to begin the development process. This takes effort and often delays the design process (and errors may creep in). Instead, one could capture the whiteboard contents in a photo and upload that to an AI routine to generate the prototype website. Sketch2Code, a web based solution has been recently introduced. It relies on AI to transform a handwritten user interface design from a picture to a valid HTML markup code.

For those who want to learn more, we recommend this article for more information.

AI is also being used in other ways, such as Adobe Sensei.

What is Adobe Sensei?

Adobe Sensei uses artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to help you discover hidden opportunities, speed up tedious processes, and offer relevant experiences to every customer. Put simply, Adobe Sensei helps you work better, smarter, and faster. Artificial intelligence makes a smarter enterprise. Adobe brought together business leaders across various industries to share their thoughts on opportunities and challenges for AI in the enterprise. Adobe Sensei puts artificial intelligence at the center of amazing customer experiences.

Find more about this approach (along with an introductory video) at this site.

The Pros and Cons of AI in Web Design

In the digital age, artificial intelligence is permeating all industries; web design is no different. For small businesses with limited human capabilities, AI allow quick interactions with customers to provide them with relevant information. AI in web development can benefit both the user and the organization.

In order to better understand the role that AI plays in web development we need to consider the impact.

Pros of using AI

  1. User experience – This is the most important aspect in web design. If a visitor to your site can’t use it effectively and efficiently, they will go elsewhere. As we know, users of a website are customers (and they will share their experiences). It’s important to make sure that your products are easy to find and customers can easily purchase them. Many customer centric website are beginning to rely on AI to improve the customer experience.
  2. Personalized Content – Content rules (whether it is videos, blogs or articles). By implementing AI on your website you can show audience certain content that is tailored to them. AI can suggest new music, videos and other relevant content for users based on their past behaviors. Users can feel comfortable discovering new content while being confident that they will find it relevant.
  3. Voice Search Optimization – One of the fastest growing design trends for web design is Voice Search Optimization. Since many customers are using their mobile devices more than their desktop, websites often have to optimize for mobile devices. In this aspect, AI can help as well.

Cons of using AI

  1. A Place for Humans – According to a study by 2030 up to 90% of all jobs will be under threat to be replaced by smart machines. This may include web design, graphic design and mobile app design. Since AI has proven to be more efficient in terms of forming content to fit on various devices, will we still need to know how to code?
  2. Privacy Issues – Since AI and machine learning can be built to monitor consumer behaviors and their interactions online, many consumers often feel uneasy. Software such as analytics when combined with AI has unlimited potential to mine customer data and insights. Therefore, it could be scary for consumers because 94% of them want to do business with a company with full transparency.
  3. Impersonal Interactions – Despite how well you have created your chat bots and automated responses, customers may still be able to tell that it was sent by AI. In the digital age, many users still want personal responses; therefore, by implementing AI we are stepping away from those much needed personal interactions.

While there are pros and cons to using AI in web design, we predict a positive future. By implementing AI into web design, we as humans can have more time for creativity and doing other important tasks. By implementing AI into web design, we as humans can have more time for creativity and doing other important tasks. Instead of focusing on the negative, we should think about what AI can do for us and how it can improve our interactions. AI is happening (and its use is evolving). For example, some are discussing the integration of AI and blockchain.

For more insights on the pros and cons using AI, we recommend this article written by Larry Head – Disruption Ahead.

Looking at the positive side of using AI in technology, Adobe CEO, Shantanu Narayen, has said “Microsoft and Adobe together is leveraging artificial intelligence to push deeper into customer relationship management and create a brand-new category and industry. Microsoft’s cloud platform Azure enables businesses to process the data at the pace they want and Adobe’s enterprise solutions allow businesses to attract customers to the platform and engage it.”

This CNBC link has more information.

More resources (for those who want to dive deeper)

Artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Web Design

How AI is Changing the Future of Web Design

Best AI Website Builders

In this week we focused on the Artificial Intelligence (what it is, why it is important with respect to web design, some technologies using this in web design, and some advantages and disadvantages).  The uses of AI are evolving rapidly; it depends us how we use it in a positive manner.

We always look forward to your comments and feedback.

We encourage members (and non-members) check out our social media channels. If you aspire to be a web professional and don’t know where to start, we offer a number of beginning classes to our members via our School Of Web learning management system. As a member, your first class is free.

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October Update – Web Employment Trends

What do we mean by employment trends?

A pattern of gradual change in a condition, output, or process, or an average or general tendency of a series of data points to move in a certain direction over time, represented by a line or curve on a graph.

This week’s blog we will seeing the latest trends in the employment (particularly for web professionals).

10 Workplace Trends in 2018

Dan Schawbel provided a forecast for the Top 10 workplace trends for the upcoming year. His purpose is to help prepare organizations for the future by collecting, assessing and reporting the trends that will most impact them. Obviously, most of these impact many industries (not just web professionals).

The top workplace trends for 2018 include:

  • Leaders encourage more human interaction
  • The next wave of learning credentials
  • Companies focus on upskilling and retraining current workers
  • Artificial intelligence becomes embedded in the workplace
  • Financial and mental wellness get prioritized
  • Employee burnout causes more turnover
  • Workforce decisions sway consumer behavior
  • Companies take diversity more seriously
  • The deregulation of labor laws
  • The aging workforce

Graphic with images of many tools (such as HTML5, CSS3, Angular, Vue, Git, PHP and more)

Trends changing how companies hire in 2018 and beyond

The HR world has changed over the past decade. Like every other field, HR is susceptible to changes and trends.

Better interviews = better hires

Traditional interviews aren’t going anywhere, but they’re getting a bit of polishing this year and beyond. If you’re looking to streamline or equalize the interview itself, there are HR software programs that essentially craft your interview script, standardizing interviews across a pool of candidates. Online skill assessments, designed to gauge a candidate’s soft skills, give you more data before a candidate ever walks through your doors in their best interview suit.

Prioritizing diversity

Diversity is a priority in just about every industry right now, and for good reason. Lack of diversity is becoming a significant liability and can lead to issues with an ever-more-diverse public.

Big Data Influence

With the increased use of hiring databases and HR software platforms capable of collecting information on employees from application to retirement, there’s no shortage of information that companies can use.

This article –Trends changing how companies hire in 2018 and beyond has more information for those who are interested.

10 Jobs That Still Can’t Find Enough Qualified Employees

Finding a job is never an easy thing to do, especially given the past decade or so of economic instability. The number of job vacancies in certain sectors is huge, and there are tons of jobs hiring.

Following are some of the jobs that employers can’t seem to fill – (note which one is at the top)

1. Web developers

2. Computer analysts

3. Industrial engineers

4. IT administrators

5. Health and medical administrators

6. Sales managers

7. Marketing professionals

8. Software developers

9. Nurses

10. Truck drivers

You can get more information by reading this article.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

If you are looking for Web Developer jobs then the Bureau of Statistics has summary for the Web Developers jobs. What developers do, work environment, how to become a Web Developer, job outlook, State and area data associated pay and more. Visit this link for the detail.

More Information

There is a wealth of information about many of these careers. We thought this list of resources would be helpful to readers.

This week we focused on the Web Employment Trends in 2018 and how companies hire in 2018 and beyond. We also have seen which jobs employers are not able to fill.

We always look forward to your comments and feedback (whether you are a member or not).

We encourage members (and non-members) check out our social media channels. If you aspire to be a web professional and don’t know where to start, we offer a number of beginning classes to our members via our School Of Web learning management system. As a member, your first class is free.

 

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Career advice, AI ethics and inspiring the next dev generation to care about the web at Web Unleashed

I just got back from Toronto, Canada, where I attended Web Unleashed a FITC organised three day conference with fifty talks in four tracks. Despite this size, the event felt cozy and not too spread out. There was a lot to learn and a truly stellar line-up of speakers to choose from.

Setting up for my AI talk

Originally I was lined up to give a workshop together with Burke Holland on developer toolchain setup, but there were not enough sign-ups, so I “only” spoke on a panel about “Life as a lead developer”, gave a talk about AI, ethics and building human interfaces and the closing keynote.

The slides of the AI and ethics talk are available here and I made a gist with all the resources I mentioned.

The closing keynote slides are also on noti.st together with the resources mentioned in that one.

The resources mentioned in this one are here:

I will write more about the subject of the closing keynote soon here.

I want to thank everyone involved in this event and hope that people learned something from my efforts. It is impressive how many great speakers were present and I had a wonderful time with some of the most relaxed parties.

I also realised that no matter how hard I try, I will never have the same presence as the devrel expert at the Shopify booth:

Walnut the dog

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September Update – Web Servers

What are Web Servers?

For those just beginning to learn about web technologies, we thought it might be helpful to provide this foundational article. A Web server is a program that uses HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol and the secure HTTPS version) to serve the files that form Web pages to visitors, in response to their requests (which come from the requesting computers browsers). Dedicated computers and appliances may be referred to as Web servers.

Web server also refers to server software, or hardware dedicated to running said software, that can serve contents to the World Wide Web. A web server processes incoming network requests over HTTP and related protocols. This Wikipedia link gives more information on Web Server.

Image of sphere with 1s and 0s

What are Web Servers Used For?

Web servers are primarily used to store process and deliver the pages of a website to users. This means that web servers are what make websites appear when you type in a URL.

Types of Web Servers

There are 4 primary web servers –

  • Apache (provided by Apache) – Apache Software Foundation established the most popular web server in the universe. Since it is open source software can be installed on almost all operating systems including, Windows, Linux FreeBSD, Mac OS X, UNIX, and more. Approximately 60% of web servers run Apache.
  • IIS (provided by Microsoft) – Microsoft created a high performance Web Server called Internet Information Server (IIS). This web server runs on Windows Server platforms (such as Windows Server 2016 and above). Although IIS comes bundled with the server operating system, it must be activated (typically done under roles and features).
  • nginx (provided by NGINX, Inc. and pronounced like “Engine X”) – NGINX accelerates content and application delivery, improves security, facilitates availability and scalability for the busiest web sites on the Internet.
  • GWS (provided by Google and short for Google Web Server) – The Google Web Server – custom-built server software used only by Google – now runs nearly 13 per cent of all active web sites.

You can find out much more information about Web Servers.

Web Server Survey by Netcraft

According to August 2018 Web Server Survey, the Apache web server remains the current leading platform in terms of its total number of domains, computers, active sites, and its proportion of the top million busiest sites, it continues to lose market share. All of Apache’s figures decreased this month, continuing a slow long-term decline in most metrics. However, Apache continues to experience long-term growth in the absolute number of web-facing computers of approximately 200k per year, but it is losing overall market share.

Related Links

Web Server

Top 5 open source web servers

What is a web server?

Definition of ‘Web Server’

GWS

We thought teachers might appreciate this background information. For those wishing to learn more, we recommend the Netcraft article mentioned above.

We hope you find these resources and overviews useful. We always look forward to your comments and feedback (whether you are a member or not).

We encourage members (and non-members) check out our social media channels. If you aspire to be a web professional and don’t know where to start, we offer a number of beginning classes to our members via our School Of Web learning management system. As a member, your first class is free.

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JavaScript Jabber podcast had me as a guest to talk about teaching and learning JavaScript

The folks at devchat.tv just published the 332nd edition of the JavaScript Jabber podcast. For about an hour a panel of people grilled me on the topic of You learned JavaScript – what now? a talk I had formerly given at a women in tech event in Berlin.

Might be worth your while, I had good fun.

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6 tips to turn your slow loading website into a brisk browsing experience

Internet users want a speedy experience and they’re not getting it, a fact that leaves them frustrated and website owners with less revenue. Don’t believe it? Numbers don’t lie. A full 53 percent of surfers want any site they visit load in three seconds or less. The largest ecommerce sites in the world recognize this necessity – they load incredibly fast. Most of the rest of the internet leaves a time gap that makes for a lot of gritted teeth and nervous toes tapping the floor. The good news is that speeding up a slow website is not difficult or time-consuming. The bad news is you might not choose to do it.

Are You Flirting with the Performance Poverty Line?

The performance poverty line is a term that represents the point at which being slow doesn’t matter because you’ve already lost most of your traffic. That number sits at around 8 seconds. The more pertinent question is, do you know your website’s speed. REALLY know your website’s speed?

No guessing because this is important stuff.

There’s an easy way to find out. Pay a visit to a website called Pingdom — it’ll probably load fast because it’s sort of their business — and enter your URL in the box. Select a location from the dropdown menu and hit “start.” Unless they’re exceptionally busy (it happens sometimes) you should get a performance summary in less than a minute.

Screen capture of Pingdom report

There’s a good chance what you see won’t impress anyone, but that’s okay. Few websites do. We’re here to provide you with a road map to get those numbers headed down, down, down and your visitors to start getting happy, happy, happy. Let’s call this…

A 6-Part Roadmap to Fast Websites and Happy Customers

Part 1: Magically Shrink Your Website

Actually, as far as we know, there’s no way to magically shrink your website but you can get the same effect by applying a sweet little bit of technology called Gzip compression. When implemented, some site owners have seen overall file size reduction of as much as 70 percent. That’s huge. Actually it’s tiny and that’s the point. It works like this. When a request hits the server to view the website, it automatically zips all the files before sending them onto the requester’s browser, where it is unzipped and displayed.

Part 2: Fix Bad Design and Too Many HTTP Requests

Every element on your website — we’re talking about images, videos, scripts, and even text — generates an individual request to the server. The more “stuff” your website has, the more requests there are and the longer it takes to load. If ever there was an argument for using a minimalistic approach when designing your website, this is it. Fewer requests mean a faster website. The tricky part is to not get distracted by all things you could do and stick to only what is needed to accomplish the site’s mission.

Overview of http requests and responses

Part 3: Put Hefty Images on a Diet

Images are huge. Incorrectly (or not at all) optimized, they put a terrible strain on bandwidth and leave the server and browser gasping from the strain. While we could write a book on the topic, there is one thing you can do that will fix a lot of the issues and that is choose the correct format — png, gif, and jpeg are good — and make the things as small as you can stand BEFORE uploading to your website. If you upload a full size image, even if you reduce it later, the server still has the original version and that’s the one that clogs the pipeline.

Part 4: Upgrade Your Hosting

We love cheap stuff as much as the next person but when it comes to choosing a web hosting plan, you need to understand the different types of plans and know when it’s time to upgrade. Inexpensive shared plans can be as low as a few dollars a month and that’s okay for a hobby or site that doesn’t have much traffic yet. Once you reach a certain level, though, the shared resource approach of this kind of plan will almost certainly mean slow-loading and downtime. While a dedicated server might not be worth the expense, a virtual private server or VPS hosting can be a great compromise.

Schematic depicting VPS

Part 5: Turn on Browser Caching

Browser caching is an easy-to-implement, tactic that most fast-loading websites use. The idea is simple. Rather than force the server to send over all the website files every time someone visits, static files (those that don’t change) are stored in the browser’s temporary memory and only dynamic files have to be retrieved. Obviously, this doesn’t help on a first visit but, with browser caching enabled, subsequent visits will be quicker. For WordPress websites, W3 Total Cache is a free plugin to look for. Others just require a simple code addition.

Part 6: Resolve Plugin Conflicts

This WordPress-specific advice is based on the reality that a lot of site owners install plugins that they never update or even use. Considering the third-party nature of these bits of software, it should be no surprise that they don’t always play nice together — they weren’t intended to. If your WordPress website is slow or buggy, one of the first actions to take is to uninstall any plugins you aren’t using. After that, turn what’s left off one at a time and check site speed. There’s a good chance you’ll find one of the culprits to slow loading.

Final Thoughts

The state of technology today is such that people expect (even if it’s not a reasonable standard) a website to load in three seconds or less. A clean, fast-loading experience will go a long ways towards creating loyal customers and more revenue, which are both good things to shoot for as an online entrepreneur. Keep in mind that the process is iterative. There’s no magic wand that will turn your site into a speed burner. Small actions taken methodically, such as the ones described, should, over time, move you incrementally closer to that three second target. Good luck and thanks for reading.

Photo of Gary Stevens

Member author Gary Stevens is a front end developer. He’s a full time blockchain geek and a volunteer working for the Ethereum foundation as well as an active Github contributor.

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Hinting at a better web at State of the Browser 2018

State of the browser is an small, annual conference in London. It originated as a format of 20 minute presentations by each browser maker followed by a panel allowing people to hear browser news straight from the horse’s mouth. It has been running for seven years (I think, hard to find out). This year was slightly different as they didn’t do a panel and there were several speakers that aren’t representatives of browser makers.

State of the browser ticks many of my happy boxes when it comes to conferences and I am highly impressed how the organisers manage to pull it off:

  • It has a great and diverse line-up of presenters
  • It is single track, with a sensible talk length
  • It is pragmatic in its approach and keeps costs low by not catering lunch but giving enough time to find some
  • It is ridiculously affordable at 30 GBP
  • And yet, they do a really good job to make you feel welcome and supported as a presenter

The conference has a low-key feel to it and that also keeps the presenters humble. There is a great diversity ticket program in place where attendees can sponsor others. The line-up was diverse and there is a focus on availability and accessibility. All the talks were streamed on YouTube and they have professional transcriptions in place that type along as the speakers present. The conference team is taking notes and publishes resources presenters covered live on the speakers’ pages on the conference site and on Twitter.

My talk this year was hinting at a better web in which I cover the changes the web went through over the years and how as developers we have a harder time keeping up with them. And how tooling and using the right resources in context of our work can help us with that.

I will write a longer article about the topic soon.

The full video stream of the conference is available here. My talk is on from 05:11:00 onwards to 05:38:00

Here is a quick recap of the talks from my POV:

  • Michelle Barker of Mud showed off the power of CSS grids and custom properties to build complex layouts on the web.
  • Dr. Ben Livshits of Brave showed how the advertising model of their browser can make the web more secure and easier for publishers
  • Sara Vieira gave a talk ranting about the overuse of DIVs in design and the general lack of quality in semantic markup and sensible, simple solutions on the web
  • Rowan Merewood of Google gave a talk about Apps, Web Apps and their overlap. His slides are available here .
  • Ada Rose Cannon of Samsung covered “WebXR and the immersive web” showing some interesting VR/AR examples running in Samsung Internet
  • Ruth John talked about using the Web Audio API for music experiments and visualization with a focus on the performance of those APIs.
  • Chris Mills of Mozilla showed the new features of the Firefox Developer Tools in Nightly talking in detail about their WYSIWYG nature. He covered the Grid Inspector, Animation Editor and a few other neat tools
  • Jeremy Keith of clearleft once again gave a highly philosophical talk about how the open web is an agreement
  • Charlie Owen of Nature Publishing ended with a ranty (in a positive sense) keynote about us over-complicating the web and thus making it far less accessible than it should be

I was happy to see some nice feedback on Twitter:

I’ve been a supporter of State of the Browser from the very beginning and I am happy to say that – if anything – it gets better every year. The dedicated team behind it are doing a bang up job.

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September Update – Useful Apps

Why Your Business Needs a Mobile App?

More and more small and midsize businesses are following the mobile trend, understanding that an effective mobile strategy involves more than just a mobile-friendly website. These days you’ll notice that many small businesses you interact with in your everyday life have their own dedicated mobile app. These companies are ahead of the game when it comes to taking their marketing to the next level.

Visual depicting individual selecting an app.

Here are 7 reasons of why your business needs a mobile App.

Speaking of apps, here are some of those we have found useful. Perhaps you rely on others. Please post yours in the comments.

Everyday Useful Apps

  • Chirr App – Chirr App makes it easy to publish Twitter threads. Twitter threads allow you to express longer ideas by splitting up a lot of text into multiple tweets. Also, Chirr App is free, and open source.
  • Slack – The hub for your team and your work. Slack is a place where your team comes together to collaborate, important information can be found by the right people, and your tools pipe in information when and where you need it. We rely on Slack for member to member communication and much more.
  • Trello – Lets you work more collaboratively and get more done. Trello’s boards, lists, and cards enable you to organize and prioritize your projects in a fun, flexible and rewarding way. This task management app gives you a visual overview of what is being worked on and who is working on it. It used the Kanban system, which was developed in Toyota as a system to keep production levels high and maintain flexibility.
  • Kiwi for gMail – Kiwi for Gmail 2.0 enables companies to use all the great functionality of G Suite apps in a better way. We make Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides look and feel as much like Microsoft Office as possible, while preserving the cloud computing benefits of G Suite. This is available for a free trial.
  • ZoomZoom is flawless video, clear audio and instant sharing. This provides remote conferencing services using cloud computing. Zoom offers communications software that combines video conferencing, online meetings, chat, and mobile collaboration.
  • iMeet (An alternative to Zoom) – iMeet is an all-in-one web, audio and video conferencing solution that gives you the tools to communicate and collaborate more effectively. Quickly share presentations or files from an integrated, cloud-hosted file cabinet using any device. This is a cloud-based video conferencing platform built in HTML 5 and Adobe Flash. iMeet allows up to 125 participants to communicate using traditional landline audio or VoIP audio and to video conference through webcams.
  • Zencastr – We have found Zencastr the easiest way to record your voip podcast interviews in studio quality. This high fidelity podcasting can record your remote interviews in studio quality and you can simply send a link and receive a separate track per guest.
  • Asana – This is a web and mobile application designed to help teams organize, track, and manage their work. Asana helps teams manage projects and tasks in one tool. Teams can create projects, assign work to teammates, specify deadlines, and communicate about tasks directly in Asana. It also includes reporting tools, file attachments, calendars, and more.

The 19 Best Small Business Apps of 2018

Here is the list of some immensely helpful apps to have in regular rotation as a small business owner. You can get more information by reading this article.

Small business apps for accounting, billing and payments

  • Square Point of Sale
  • Intuit QuickBooks
  • Xero
  • Zoho Books

Small business apps for documents and pictures

  • Dropbox
  • HelloSign
  • PicMonkey

Small business apps for inventory and shipping

  • ShipStation
  • Shopventory
  • Shyp

Small business apps for communication and employee management

  • Homebase
  • When I Work
  • TSheets
  • Expensify

Small business apps for organization

  • Evernote

Related Links

We thought readers might be interested in these articles covering additional apps as well.

We reviewed some useful Apps which we are familiar with (and we use many of these). We also focused on the small business apps of 2018. We hope you find these resources useful. We always look forward to your comments and feedback (whether you are a member or not). Don’t forget to add the apps you find helpful in the comments.

We encourage members (and non-members) check out our social media channels. If you aspire to be a web professional and don’t know where to start, we offer a number of beginning classes to our members via our School Of Web learning management system. As a member, your first class is free.

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Slides and resources for my Reasons.to 2018 keynote “taking the vile out of privilege”

I just came back from Reasons.to conference where I gave the opening keynote about the perils of social media and how we should use the privileges we have to make them better. I will do a longer write-up about this later, but a lot of people asked for the slides and links to the resources I covered, so here you go.

Lovely tweets

Slides

Resources

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September Update – Virtual Reality and the Web

What is Virtual Reality?

The computer-generated simulation of a three-dimensional image or environment that can be interacted with in a seemingly real or physical way by a person using special electronic equipment, such as a helmet with a screen inside or gloves fitted with sensors. The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both ‘virtual’ and ‘reality’. The definition of ‘virtual’ is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term ‘virtual reality’ basically means ‘near-reality’. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

VR example showing a castle emerging from a smart phone

How is virtual reality achieved?

Today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality. This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronized and mediated experience.

What is WebVR?

WebVR is an open specification that makes it possible to experience VR in your browser. The goal is to make it easier for everyone to get into VR experiences, no matter what device you have.

This WebVR article tells about how to experience VR and if you have headset and browser to use. It also tells us how we can experience the WebVR if we don’t have the headset.

WebVR — Virtual Reality for the Web

The concept of virtual reality in itself isn’t new, but now we have the technology to have it working as it should be, and a JavaScript API to make use of it in web applications. This article introduced WebVR from the perspective of its use in games.

It also focuses on following topics:

  • VR devices
  • The WebVR API
  • Tools and techniques
  • The future of WebVR

Key Elements of a Virtual Reality Experience

For those who wish to learn more about virtual reality and the web, we encourage you to review these articles.

In this week we reviewed what is happening with Virtual Reality and the Web, including, the key elements of virtual reality and its experience. We also provided more information on the WebVR concepts, also how the VR headset works. We hope you find these resources and overviews useful. We always look forward to your comments and feedback (whether you are a member or not).

The potential for this is growing rapidly. This is evidenced by the latest version of Adobe Captivate (Captivate 2019) which includes the ability to create Virtual Reality learning projects (which you can publish as a web page).

We encourage members (and non-members) check out our social media channels. If you aspire to be a web professional and don’t know where to start, we offer a number of beginning classes to our members via our School Of Web learning management system. As a member, your first class is free.

The post September Update – Virtual Reality and the Web appeared first on Web Professionals.

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